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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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Compare Software Solutions
Visit the TEC store to compare leading software solutions by funtionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.
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 the concept of scm


Challenges of the Future: The Rebirth of Small Independent Retail in America
By any measure, retailers are overwhelming small businesses. More than 95 percent of all retailers have only one store. Almost 90 percent have sales less than

the concept of scm  costs continue to rise. The concept of a mass communications market is fading fast. The trend of personalization discussed earlier points to this conclusion. The big national consumer product advertisers were the first to recognize this trend. They are redeploying their large network TV budgets into other, newer forms of advertising and promotion like sponsorships, cable TV, custom publishing and Internet search advertising in an effort to extend their brands and make them more relevant to changing co

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Supply Chain Management (SCM)

Supply chain management (SCM) solutions include applications for managing supplier, manufacturer, wholesaler, retailer, and customer business processes. Addressing demand management, warehouse management, international trade logistics, transportation execution, and many other issues for a complete solution, this knowledge base will support your evaluation of an SCM suite. 

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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Driving Costs Out of the Supply Chain: Inbound Logistics


One of the most neglected areas of the manufacturing and retail supply chain is the inbound logistics segment. Following best practices and creating a collaborative allows companies to save money and streamline operations.

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SAP SCM-Stepping Out of Obscurity


Major new SAP products are being released in the realms of supply chain management (SCM), manufacturing execution systems (MES), and product lifecycle management (PLM). TEC principal analyst P.J. Jakovljevic examines the solutions that SAP is offering for supply chain executives to expand beyond the traditional boundaries of SCM, PLM, and enterprise resource planning (ERP).

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The Rise of Price Management


New analytical software tools have recently emerged to combine and condense a wealth of information that should give the salesperson a more definitive "yes or no" answer fairly quickly when it comes to offering specific pricing, while also giving management a higher-level view of business efficiency and profit/loss drivers.

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Software-as-a-service ERP versus On-premise ERP through the Lens of Total Cost of Ownership


This IDC white paper looks at the growing applicability of software as a service (SaaS) for enterprise-level business applications, and analyzes the adoption rate and total cost of ownership (TCO) of this technological approach. Download this white paper to find out how a hosted option can drive significant cost savings, reduce initial implementation times, and bring new functionality with relative ease and convenience.

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The Benefits of Running Your Business Software in the Cloud: Strategies for Success


With the growth of cloud computing, businesses must understand their application footprint, how applications and business processes cross departments and lines of business, and how to optimize their applications architecture around collaboration and process. This white paper shows how businesses can position themselves for cost-effective growth and improved competitiveness by combining an integration applications strategy with cloud delivery.

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The Art Of Distributed Development Of Multi-Lingual Three-Tier Internet Applications


In this article we describe author's experience with the distributed development of multi-lingual three-tier Java/ CORBA/database Internet applications. We believe that the described tips and tricks of trade may be of great use to readers who are involved with Java applications development.

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Performance-driven Learning: Putting the Horse before the Cart to Lead Organizational Growth - Talen


Automating employee development based on performance objectives with integrated talent management technology. Organizations are turning to talent management suites to link strategic functions such as goal alignment, performance management, competencies, compensation, development, and succession planning.

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